Tuesday, September 2, 2014 Friday, August 29, 2014

Remember when my brother and I started a band called Bitmap Bombardier, and we put out a rad album, and then we broke up? Well we’re BACK TOGETHER with another rad album, paying tribute to—obviously—The Gilmore Girls. Download it for FREE.

Hollow Stars: A Tribute to Rory’s Heart by Bitmap Bombardier

We’ll probably break up again now.

queersinhistory:

TAMARA DE LEMPICKA 1898–1980
Polish art deco painter, glamorous socialite. Born to a wealthy family in Poland, she escaped to Paris with her husband in 1918, where she immediately began to pursue painting. Her style borrowed from the deconstructed forms of the cubists, combined with the sleek decadence of art deco. Well known for her scandalous sexual appetite along with her art, she was constantly having affairs with men and women, and fell into a circle of notable bisexual women including Vita Sackville-West and Colette. In 1939, she moved to America with her second husband to escape WWII, and became a favorite artist among the Hollywood set. Her work fell out of favor in the 1960s, only to find a new surge of popularity shortly before her death.

queersinhistory:

TAMARA DE LEMPICKA 1898–1980

Polish art deco painter, glamorous socialite. Born to a wealthy family in Poland, she escaped to Paris with her husband in 1918, where she immediately began to pursue painting. Her style borrowed from the deconstructed forms of the cubists, combined with the sleek decadence of art deco. Well known for her scandalous sexual appetite along with her art, she was constantly having affairs with men and women, and fell into a circle of notable bisexual women including Vita Sackville-West and Colette. In 1939, she moved to America with her second husband to escape WWII, and became a favorite artist among the Hollywood set. Her work fell out of favor in the 1960s, only to find a new surge of popularity shortly before her death.

bushwickreview:

Congratulations to Mike Rosenthal, whose book Twitter: The Comic (The Book) was published by Chronicle Books this month. He’s created a book of comics from the weirdest and funniest tweets around. 
Mike Rosenthal was a contributor to The Bushwick Review III. He and Michele Rosenthal (who has been in every issue of The Bushwick Review) are the power siblings of illustration. 

Yeah, hey, listen up! My brother made a book, and it’s hilarious, and you should go to your local bookstore and demand to purchase one right now.

bushwickreview:

Congratulations to Mike Rosenthal, whose book Twitter: The Comic (The Book) was published by Chronicle Books this month. He’s created a book of comics from the weirdest and funniest tweets around. 

Mike Rosenthal was a contributor to The Bushwick Review III. He and Michele Rosenthal (who has been in every issue of The Bushwick Review) are the power siblings of illustration. 

Yeah, hey, listen up! My brother made a book, and it’s hilarious, and you should go to your local bookstore and demand to purchase one right now.

Friday, August 8, 2014
queersinhistory:

TRUMAN CAPOTE 1924–1984
American fiction and nonfiction author, best known for Breakfast at Tiffany’s and In Cold Blood. Raised in the south, he began writing at age 11, and had his break with the short story “Miriam” at age 21. His follow up novel gained notoriety for its back cover photo depicting Capote suggestively lounging and making eyes at the camera. He was openly gay with an effeminate and affected manner, and though he battled homophobia throughout his rise to fame, he still managed to become a cultural darling and an adored member of the celebrity socialite set. His fame reach a peak with the publication of In Cold Blood, which he called a “nonfiction novel.” Heavy drinking marred the later part of his life, and In Cold Blood became the last novel he would ever finish. His long term relationship with writer Jack Dunphy lasted, in one form or another, from Capote’s 20s up until his death.

queersinhistory:

TRUMAN CAPOTE 1924–1984

American fiction and nonfiction author, best known for Breakfast at Tiffany’s and In Cold Blood. Raised in the south, he began writing at age 11, and had his break with the short story “Miriam” at age 21. His follow up novel gained notoriety for its back cover photo depicting Capote suggestively lounging and making eyes at the camera. He was openly gay with an effeminate and affected manner, and though he battled homophobia throughout his rise to fame, he still managed to become a cultural darling and an adored member of the celebrity socialite set. His fame reach a peak with the publication of In Cold Blood, which he called a “nonfiction novel.” Heavy drinking marred the later part of his life, and In Cold Blood became the last novel he would ever finish. His long term relationship with writer Jack Dunphy lasted, in one form or another, from Capote’s 20s up until his death.

Monday, August 4, 2014
I wasn’t crazy about BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR, but that’s a good excuse to go a bit irreverent. My full review is here on Criterion Affection.

I wasn’t crazy about BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR, but that’s a good excuse to go a bit irreverent. My full review is here on Criterion Affection.

Friday, August 1, 2014
topsidepress:

Isn’t Michele Rosenthal’s cover for He Mele A Hilo great. You know what else is great? The book. it’s not out on general release yet, but you can get it here:
http://store.topsidepress.com/shop/he-mele-a-hilo/

I had great fun working on this one!

topsidepress:

Isn’t Michele Rosenthal’s cover for He Mele A Hilo great. You know what else is great? The book. it’s not out on general release yet, but you can get it here:

http://store.topsidepress.com/shop/he-mele-a-hilo/

I had great fun working on this one!

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
queersinhistory:

AUDRE LORDE 1934-1992
Author, poet, feminist, and self-described warrior. She was born to Caribbean immigrants in Harlem and began writing poetry at a young age. Her childhood, years of sexual awakening, and experiences of the gay scene in 1950s Greenwich Village are detailed in her beautiful 1982 novel Zami: A New Spelling of My Name, which she called a “biomythography.” In addition to inventing genres, she also contributed to modern feminist thought by asserting that her dual identities as black and lesbian were intertwined, and by criticizing feminists in the 60s who ignored the racial and sexual divides that exist among women. She was the New York State Poet Laureate from 1991 until her death the following year, after a long battle with cancer.

queersinhistory:

AUDRE LORDE 1934-1992

Author, poet, feminist, and self-described warrior. She was born to Caribbean immigrants in Harlem and began writing poetry at a young age. Her childhood, years of sexual awakening, and experiences of the gay scene in 1950s Greenwich Village are detailed in her beautiful 1982 novel Zami: A New Spelling of My Name, which she called a “biomythography.” In addition to inventing genres, she also contributed to modern feminist thought by asserting that her dual identities as black and lesbian were intertwined, and by criticizing feminists in the 60s who ignored the racial and sexual divides that exist among women. She was the New York State Poet Laureate from 1991 until her death the following year, after a long battle with cancer.

Saturday, July 26, 2014
queersinhistory:

ROCK HUDSON 1925–1985
American actor, and one of the most popular leading men of his time. A product of the Hollywood star system, he got his start playing dramatic roles in films such as All That Heaven Allows and Giant. His popularity grew when he began appearing in romantic comedies opposite Doris Day. Their first was Pillow Talk, with the memorable scene of Hudson’s character “pretending” to be gay in order to win the girl. Hudson’s actual homosexuality was a carefully kept secret, though well-known among his friends, and by the 70s he could sometimes be spotted amidst California’s gay scene. When it was announced in 1985 that he had AIDS, he became the most beloved celebrity associated with the disease, and his death shortly thereafter was a turning point in raising awareness and lessening its stigma.

queersinhistory:

ROCK HUDSON 1925–1985

American actor, and one of the most popular leading men of his time. A product of the Hollywood star system, he got his start playing dramatic roles in films such as All That Heaven Allows and Giant. His popularity grew when he began appearing in romantic comedies opposite Doris Day. Their first was Pillow Talk, with the memorable scene of Hudson’s character “pretending” to be gay in order to win the girl. Hudson’s actual homosexuality was a carefully kept secret, though well-known among his friends, and by the 70s he could sometimes be spotted amidst California’s gay scene. When it was announced in 1985 that he had AIDS, he became the most beloved celebrity associated with the disease, and his death shortly thereafter was a turning point in raising awareness and lessening its stigma.

Saturday, June 14, 2014
queersinhistory:

KEITH HARING 1958–1990
Street artist and pop artist, who created a large body of beloved and instantly recognizable work before his untimely death. Haring moved to New York City in 1980, and his bold, colorful drawings immediately began appearing all over the subway system. His art gained quick popularity throughout the decade; by 1986, he was being invited to paint murals around the world, and opening his own store in SoHo. His subjects ranged from love and sex to more political anti-drug and anti-Apartheid messages. After he was diagnosed with AIDS, he focused more and more on creating art about homosexuality, the importance of safe sex, and the disease itself. He continued to work up until his death.

queersinhistory:

KEITH HARING 1958–1990

Street artist and pop artist, who created a large body of beloved and instantly recognizable work before his untimely death. Haring moved to New York City in 1980, and his bold, colorful drawings immediately began appearing all over the subway system. His art gained quick popularity throughout the decade; by 1986, he was being invited to paint murals around the world, and opening his own store in SoHo. His subjects ranged from love and sex to more political anti-drug and anti-Apartheid messages. After he was diagnosed with AIDS, he focused more and more on creating art about homosexuality, the importance of safe sex, and the disease itself. He continued to work up until his death.