Saturday, June 14, 2014
queersinhistory:

KEITH HARING 1958–1990
Street artist and pop artist, who created a large body of beloved and instantly recognizable work before his untimely death. Haring moved to New York City in 1980, and his bold, colorful drawings immediately began appearing all over the subway system. His art gained quick popularity throughout the decade; by 1986, he was being invited to paint murals around the world, and opening his own store in SoHo. His subjects ranged from love and sex to more political anti-drug and anti-Apartheid messages. After he was diagnosed with AIDS, he focused more and more on creating art about homosexuality, the importance of safe sex, and the disease itself. He continued to work up until his death.

queersinhistory:

KEITH HARING 1958–1990

Street artist and pop artist, who created a large body of beloved and instantly recognizable work before his untimely death. Haring moved to New York City in 1980, and his bold, colorful drawings immediately began appearing all over the subway system. His art gained quick popularity throughout the decade; by 1986, he was being invited to paint murals around the world, and opening his own store in SoHo. His subjects ranged from love and sex to more political anti-drug and anti-Apartheid messages. After he was diagnosed with AIDS, he focused more and more on creating art about homosexuality, the importance of safe sex, and the disease itself. He continued to work up until his death.

Friday, June 13, 2014
snackaddict:

2013 Movie Journal Entry #40: Blue is the Warmest Color, guest starring Michele Rosenthal!
Michele is endeavoring to watch every single Criterion movie ever, which is a crazy and wonderful goal. Check out her Criterion Affection blog where she posts illustrations for some choice selections she’s seen.

Hey, that’s cartoon-me, being hyper negative about all lesbian films! Go follow my awesome friend Jordan, who has been posting so many great comics lately, film-related and otherwise.

snackaddict:

2013 Movie Journal Entry #40: Blue is the Warmest Color, guest starring Michele Rosenthal!

Michele is endeavoring to watch every single Criterion movie ever, which is a crazy and wonderful goal. Check out her Criterion Affection blog where she posts illustrations for some choice selections she’s seen.

Hey, that’s cartoon-me, being hyper negative about all lesbian films! Go follow my awesome friend Jordan, who has been posting so many great comics lately, film-related and otherwise.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014
queersinhistory:

COLE PORTER 1891–1964
Composer and lyricist, responsible for some of the most well known musicals and standards from the 20s and 30s. Songs to his credit include “Night and Day,” “Love for Sale,” “I Get a Kick Out of You,”  “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” “My Heart Belongs to Daddy,” “Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye,” “Too Darn Hot,” and so on. Porter came from a wealthy family that supported his interest in music from a young age. During his years in Paris, he married Linda Lee Thomas, a socialite and Porter’s confidante who did not mind that her husband was gay. Nor did she mind his weekend all-male parties and string of intense love affairs, as long as he was discrete. In 1937, he suffered a traumatic injury to his leg that left him in constant pain, and eventually led to an amputation. By the 1940s, many thought his career was over. But he made a comeback in 1948 with Kiss Me Kate, which became by far his most successful musical.

queersinhistory:

COLE PORTER 1891–1964

Composer and lyricist, responsible for some of the most well known musicals and standards from the 20s and 30s. Songs to his credit include “Night and Day,” “Love for Sale,” “I Get a Kick Out of You,”  “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” “My Heart Belongs to Daddy,” “Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye,” “Too Darn Hot,” and so on. Porter came from a wealthy family that supported his interest in music from a young age. During his years in Paris, he married Linda Lee Thomas, a socialite and Porter’s confidante who did not mind that her husband was gay. Nor did she mind his weekend all-male parties and string of intense love affairs, as long as he was discrete. In 1937, he suffered a traumatic injury to his leg that left him in constant pain, and eventually led to an amputation. By the 1940s, many thought his career was over. But he made a comeback in 1948 with Kiss Me Kate, which became by far his most successful musical.

Monday, June 2, 2014
A couple of unused farm logo sketches. I thought they were cute.

A couple of unused farm logo sketches. I thought they were cute.

Monday, May 26, 2014
bushwickreview:

Back in 2012, The Bushwick Review contributors traded in print zines for being a troupe of actors, in this Bushwick homage to Orson Welles’ Mercury Theatre Players. The New York Crimes was an hour-long modern radio play that was broadcast in four parts. Many of its 20+ actors were contributors to The Bushwick Review. 
—-
The New York Crimes is a modern radio play written and recorded by Kristen Felicetti. Albert and Wallace Wren are two twentysomething brothers living an aimless existence in Brooklyn, until they are offerered a unique job by Norman Avery, a reclusive writer. Norman hires them to be private investigators for his company, an underground detective agency made up of over-educated and directionless young people in their twenties. As Albert and Wallace investigate their first case, they encounter a variety of New York characters during their adventures. The brothers perform at underground music venues, get in car chases, take acting classes with a vain actress, sneak around a hipster trailer park, all while drinking whiskey, chain smoking, and trying their best to imitate the lifestyle of hard-boiled detectives.Employing a narrator and a serial format, The New York Crimes is a comedy/mystery that references old-time radio plays of the past, but has a contemporary setting, story, and attitude. It features the voices of over twenty actors, music of all eras, many sound effects, and a love for sound in general.
—-
Illustration by Michele Rosenthal. 

I drew this a while back. I also acted in it.

bushwickreview:

Back in 2012, The Bushwick Review contributors traded in print zines for being a troupe of actors, in this Bushwick homage to Orson Welles’ Mercury Theatre Players. The New York Crimes was an hour-long modern radio play that was broadcast in four parts. Many of its 20+ actors were contributors to The Bushwick Review.

—-

The New York Crimes is a modern radio play written and recorded by Kristen Felicetti. Albert and Wallace Wren are two twentysomething brothers living an aimless existence in Brooklyn, until they are offerered a unique job by Norman Avery, a reclusive writer. Norman hires them to be private investigators for his company, an underground detective agency made up of over-educated and directionless young people in their twenties. As Albert and Wallace investigate their first case, they encounter a variety of New York characters during their adventures. The brothers perform at underground music venues, get in car chases, take acting classes with a vain actress, sneak around a hipster trailer park, all while drinking whiskey, chain smoking, and trying their best to imitate the lifestyle of hard-boiled detectives.

Employing a narrator and a serial format, The New York Crimes is a comedy/mystery that references old-time radio plays of the past, but has a contemporary setting, story, and attitude. It features the voices of over twenty actors, music of all eras, many sound effects, and a love for sound in general.

—-

Illustration by Michele Rosenthal

I drew this a while back. I also acted in it.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014
queersinhistory:

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS 1911–1983

Celebrated American playwright and screenwriter, known for The Glass Menagerie, A Streetcar Named Desire, and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof among others. He had a difficult childhood in the south, where he grew up with an abusive father, an overbearing mother, and a loving sister who was eventually institutionalized. His dysfunctional family became the inspiration for much of his work, and The Glass Menagerie, which brought him to fame, was mostly autobiographical. Throughout his life, his homosexuality was an open secret, and publicly confirmed in the post-Stonewall era. Many of his short stories and plays deal with gay themes directly, though rarely in a positive light, which reflected Williams’ own dissatisfaction with being gay. At the height of his career, he created a string of successful plays, adapting many of them into award-winning films. Sadly, his later life was marked by drugs, alcohol, and depression at the death of his longtime partner, Frank Merlo.

queersinhistory:

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS 1911–1983

Celebrated American playwright and screenwriter, known for The Glass Menagerie, A Streetcar Named Desire, and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof among others. He had a difficult childhood in the south, where he grew up with an abusive father, an overbearing mother, and a loving sister who was eventually institutionalized. His dysfunctional family became the inspiration for much of his work, and The Glass Menagerie, which brought him to fame, was mostly autobiographical. Throughout his life, his homosexuality was an open secret, and publicly confirmed in the post-Stonewall era. Many of his short stories and plays deal with gay themes directly, though rarely in a positive light, which reflected Williams’ own dissatisfaction with being gay. At the height of his career, he created a string of successful plays, adapting many of them into award-winning films. Sadly, his later life was marked by drugs, alcohol, and depression at the death of his longtime partner, Frank Merlo.

Monday, May 19, 2014
In addition to a four page comic, I also created this illustration for the recently released Bushwick Review V. If you missed the release party, which was way super cool, you can still pick up your own copy here. Or maybe you should follow bushwickreview.tumblr.com.

In addition to a four page comic, I also created this illustration for the recently released Bushwick Review V. If you missed the release party, which was way super cool, you can still pick up your own copy here. Or maybe you should follow bushwickreview.tumblr.com.

Saturday, May 17, 2014
bushwickreview:

Look at this nice flyer Tim Vienckowski made for Saturday’s party.There will be performances and readings by Joel Alter and Jen Tong, Gabby Bess, Oscar Bruno D’Artois and LK Shaw, Shane Jones, Zebadiah Keneally, and Michele Rosenthal. Originally this poster was going to be another secret magic-eye saying “PARTY” or “CRUNK” or “BEER”. But we got a little magic-eyed out. 
Still, you should definitely get ready to PARTY. 
And get CRUNK by buying lots of BEER, cause it benefits Mellow Pages, which is a special and wonderful place.

Zine release party tonight! I will be there, doing a somewhat inappropriate reading from my comic.

bushwickreview:

Look at this nice flyer Tim Vienckowski made for Saturday’s party.

There will be performances and readings by Joel Alter and Jen Tong, Gabby Bess, Oscar Bruno D’Artois and LK Shaw, Shane Jones, Zebadiah Keneally, and Michele Rosenthal

Originally this poster was going to be another secret magic-eye saying “PARTY” or “CRUNK” or “BEER”. But we got a little magic-eyed out. 

Still, you should definitely get ready to PARTY. 

And get CRUNK by buying lots of BEER, cause it benefits Mellow Pages, which is a special and wonderful place.

Zine release party tonight! I will be there, doing a somewhat inappropriate reading from my comic.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

I recently had the chance to illustrate and design this cover for Ryka Aoki’s novel He Mele A Hilo, which tells the story of intersecting lives in Hawaii. It’s a lovely book, available for purchase here. Thanks to Tom and Riley at Topside Press for the fun assignment!

Friday, May 9, 2014
Illustration for what I recently decided is my #1 favorite New Wave film, reviewed here.

Illustration for what I recently decided is my #1 favorite New Wave film, reviewed here.