Thursday, October 16, 2014
twitterthecomic:

Classic tweet by @TheAnimePolice drawn by @dialmformichele

I’m reblogging this simply to cash in on the skeleton war meme.

twitterthecomic:

Classic tweet by @TheAnimePolice drawn by @dialmformichele

I’m reblogging this simply to cash in on the skeleton war meme.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Here is my Jubilee artwork for the “Daughters of the Atom” X-Men show at One Shot Gallery, a loving little gallery space in the back of St. Mark’s Comics. And here’s a photo of me to go with it, with photo credit to dear friend Joel Alter. You missed the opening, but you can still see it on display.

You can also purchase a limited-run print here, and show some love to an under-loved little badass. (I’m talking about Jubilee, not me.)

Friday, October 10, 2014
If you’re looking for something to do in NYC tonight, I’m going to be participating in this X-Women themed show at St. Mark’s Comics. Opening is tonight from 8 to 10. AND there will be a cosplay contest, so come dressed up if you feel so inclined!

If you’re looking for something to do in NYC tonight, I’m going to be participating in this X-Women themed show at St. Mark’s Comics. Opening is tonight from 8 to 10. AND there will be a cosplay contest, so come dressed up if you feel so inclined!

Thursday, October 9, 2014
queersinhistory:

DIVINE 1945–1988
Actor, drag queen, and cult icon, best known for his transgressive work with director John Waters. Born Harry Glenn Milstead, he and Waters lived on the same street in Baltimore, and their eventual friendship led to Divine’s first appearances on film. Waters not only encouraged that he perform in drag, but he also invented the stage name Divine and helped develop a shocking look and persona. One of Divine’s most memorable moments, and a scene that launched him to cult status, came at the end of Pink Flamingos when he actually ate dog feces for the camera. The notoriety that followed launched him into a varied career of film, theater, club performances, and even a few disco hits—usually performed in drag, although he also strived to be taken seriously as a male actor. During this time he enjoyed an underground celebrity status and had a number of relationships with other men. In 1988, he had one of his most successful roles as Edna Turnblad in Hairspray. Sadly, it was also his final role. He died in his sleep of an enlarged heart, just before he was scheduled to make a guest appearance on Married… with Children.

queersinhistory:

DIVINE 1945–1988

Actor, drag queen, and cult icon, best known for his transgressive work with director John Waters. Born Harry Glenn Milstead, he and Waters lived on the same street in Baltimore, and their eventual friendship led to Divine’s first appearances on film. Waters not only encouraged that he perform in drag, but he also invented the stage name Divine and helped develop a shocking look and persona. One of Divine’s most memorable moments, and a scene that launched him to cult status, came at the end of Pink Flamingos when he actually ate dog feces for the camera. The notoriety that followed launched him into a varied career of film, theater, club performances, and even a few disco hits—usually performed in drag, although he also strived to be taken seriously as a male actor. During this time he enjoyed an underground celebrity status and had a number of relationships with other men. In 1988, he had one of his most successful roles as Edna Turnblad in Hairspray. Sadly, it was also his final role. He died in his sleep of an enlarged heart, just before he was scheduled to make a guest appearance on Married… with Children.

Friday, October 3, 2014

I’m not a big photographer, but here are a few photos of an amazing weekend I recently had at Highlights Magazine. I have nothing to compare this experience to. They drove me down to their headquarters in Pennsylvania, gave me my own bucolic cabin to stay in, cooked me delicious meals and provided unlimited ice cream and smores. I also got to meet a lot of the Highlights staff, learn more about the company, and take a short hike through the woods. But the most amazing part was spending time with 30 other illustrators. We talked shop, shared experiences, saw each other’s work, and everyone was incredibly fun and encouraging. By the end, I was feeling pretty darn good about being an illustrator. So thank you Highlights for this unique invitation. I got so much out of it—not just my new-found knowledge on creating Hidden Pictures.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
In the process of trying to clear some things out of my life, I’m selling a bunch of silly little paintings for very very cheap. Snatch them up before someone else does. I’ve also slashed the prices of most of my prints in the store, because screw it, everything must go.
http://dialmformichele.etsy.com/

In the process of trying to clear some things out of my life, I’m selling a bunch of silly little paintings for very very cheap. Snatch them up before someone else does. I’ve also slashed the prices of most of my prints in the store, because screw it, everything must go.

http://dialmformichele.etsy.com/

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
queersinhistory:

LABI SIFFRE 1945–
British singer-songwriter, poet, and activist. He released a number of albums in the 70s, and had his first hit in 1971 with “It Must Be Love,” which charted even higher when it was later covered by Madness. In 1985, after a hiatus from music, he released his most successful single “(Something Inside) So Strong” in response to Apartheid and inspired by his experiences as a gay man. His song “I Got The…” provided the rhythm for Eminem’s 1999 hit “My Name Is,” although Siffre first refused Dr. Dre the sample until lyrics attacking women and gay people had been removed—what Siffre called “lazy songwriting.” (Later versions of the song reinstated the lyrics in question anyway.) More recently, Siffre’s “My Song” was sampled on Kanye West’s track “I Wonder.” Siffre has been openly gay throughout his career, and has never shied from addressing racism and homophobia in his work.

queersinhistory:

LABI SIFFRE 1945–

British singer-songwriter, poet, and activist. He released a number of albums in the 70s, and had his first hit in 1971 with “It Must Be Love,” which charted even higher when it was later covered by Madness. In 1985, after a hiatus from music, he released his most successful single “(Something Inside) So Strong” in response to Apartheid and inspired by his experiences as a gay man. His song “I Got The…” provided the rhythm for Eminem’s 1999 hit “My Name Is,” although Siffre first refused Dr. Dre the sample until lyrics attacking women and gay people had been removed—what Siffre called “lazy songwriting.” (Later versions of the song reinstated the lyrics in question anyway.) More recently, Siffre’s “My Song” was sampled on Kanye West’s track “I Wonder.” Siffre has been openly gay throughout his career, and has never shied from addressing racism and homophobia in his work.

Thursday, September 18, 2014
queersinhistory:

LEONARD BERNSTEIN 1918–1990
American composer and conductor, known for his years as music director of the New York Philharmonic, and for his works ranging from classical compositions to musical theater, most notably the music from West Side Story. Born to Jewish immigrant parents, he fell in love with music at a young age, and eventually studied it at Harvard. He was thrust into the spotlight in 1943 when he replaced a suddenly ill conductor for a nationally broadcast concert. From that springboard, he enjoyed a long and successful career, conducting symphonies around the world and composing his own works. He also hosted a series of televised lectures which popularized classical music throughout American homes. Though he had a number of affairs with men, Bernstein was happily married for 25 years. This changed in 1976 when he decided to live openly with his boyfriend, then returned to his wife a year later when she became ill. He wasn’t open about his sexuality until later in life, but Bernstein was often open about his liberal views, which included being anti-war, pro-Black Panther Party, and pro-rock and roll.

queersinhistory:

LEONARD BERNSTEIN 1918–1990

American composer and conductor, known for his years as music director of the New York Philharmonic, and for his works ranging from classical compositions to musical theater, most notably the music from West Side Story. Born to Jewish immigrant parents, he fell in love with music at a young age, and eventually studied it at Harvard. He was thrust into the spotlight in 1943 when he replaced a suddenly ill conductor for a nationally broadcast concert. From that springboard, he enjoyed a long and successful career, conducting symphonies around the world and composing his own works. He also hosted a series of televised lectures which popularized classical music throughout American homes. Though he had a number of affairs with men, Bernstein was happily married for 25 years. This changed in 1976 when he decided to live openly with his boyfriend, then returned to his wife a year later when she became ill. He wasn’t open about his sexuality until later in life, but Bernstein was often open about his liberal views, which included being anti-war, pro-Black Panther Party, and pro-rock and roll.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
You know that feeling when you get sucked into an internet vortex of one link leading into another leading into the comment section populated by misinformed probably-thirteen-year-olds, only to snap out of it two hours later despairing of humanity and also hungry?

You know that feeling when you get sucked into an internet vortex of one link leading into another leading into the comment section populated by misinformed probably-thirteen-year-olds, only to snap out of it two hours later despairing of humanity and also hungry?

Monday, September 15, 2014
I only just recently started listening to Welcome To Night Vale, and very immediately got super hooked. So I made some art.

I only just recently started listening to Welcome To Night Vale, and very immediately got super hooked. So I made some art.